Meg Whitman

It’s finally time. This week the technology industry will witness what could arguably be the biggest split in the industry, when HP officially becomes Hewlett-Packard Enterprise and HP Inc. Over the last few months, the channel has been bracing itself for the transition, which is seeing new leadership, new partner programs, logos, and products and services. Here’s a recap of what’s changing.

HP-Split-chart

Business Units

For those that need a quick refresh on who is taking what in the split, this chart serves as a good reminder. By now, however, the two sides should have been operating autonomously for almost three months, at least according to plans discussed by John Hinshaw. At the HP Discover conference in Las Vegas, the company’s executive vice president of technology and operations said that separation would be unofficially complete by Aug 1.

Read more: HP’s split is at 80 per cent completion

HP and HPE logosWS

New logos

By now, you may have gotten accustomed to the new HPE logo (on the right) featuring the green rectangle, but many in the industry will remember raising an eyebrow when it was unveiled in April. No split along company lines would be complete with a rebranding, however, and in this case, it’s the data centre and infrastructure business that got the short (or should we say green) end of the stick.

Read more: Meg Whitman on Hewlett Packard Enterprise branding and new direction

HP Inc Executives

Executive teams

Hewlett Packard Enterprise

  • Meg Whitman, president and CEO
  • Tim Stonesifer, CFO
  • Chris Hsu, COO
  • John Schultz, General Counsel
  • Henry Gomez, CMO and Chief Communications Officer
  • Martin Fink CTO, Hewlett Packard Labs lead
HP Inc.

  • Dion Weisler, president and CEO
  • Cathie Lesjak, CFO
  • Jon Flaxman, COO
  • Shane Wall, CTO

For the full list click here.

lloyd bryant and charlie Atkinson

Canadian leaders

Speaking of changes in senior teams, what was once HP Canada will see its general manager Lloyd Bryant (left) take over as the managing director for HP Inc. in Canada.  Meanwhile, Charlie Atkinson will oversee HP Enterprise in Canada.

Read more: HP Canada shakeup: Executives prepare for new roles after the split

HP Z240 SFF Workstation, HP Z240 Tower Workstation, and Dual HP Z23n Displays

Channel Programs

The HP PartnerOne program that has supported the channel since 2002 is no more. Moving forward, those looking to do business with HP Inc. will have to turn to what the company is calling “PartnerFirst” while the enterprise will turn to “PartnerReady.”

PartnerOne has been redesigned and renamed PartnerFirst to focus on PCs, printing and imaging equipment, supplies that can track volume and more, while introducing the PartnerFirst ServiceOne program.

Meanwhile, PartnerReady will focus on profitability, demand and enablement.

Read more: HP PartnerOne program to separate on company lines

workforce employees

Downsizing

HP may shrink more before it grows. Over the course of its separation, it has already cut between 80,000 to 85,000 jobs from its 300,000 workforce. While reports indicate that the enterprise business is growing, the personal computing side is still losing revenue.  Time will tell what other restructuring may be needed for the company to weather declining PC sales.

Read more: HP is cutting another 10 per cent of its workforce

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Where does it go from here?

Chief executive Meg Whitman had promised that it would be “keeping customers and partners at the forefront.” During the transition, it has certainly continued updates with announcements in workstations, PCs and printers designed for millennials and SMBs, 3PAR StoreServ Storage, TippingPoint Threat Protection, its partnership with VMware in the server space, Windows 10 migration service portfolioInstant Ink in Canada, and more.  Let’s see if the pace continues, and whether it’s in the right direction.


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