Attacks on supply chains are becoming more frequent, meaning that organizations need to consider what they can do to become more resilient to attacks.

Organizations and their information security teams can protect their networks from such attacks by ensuring that infrastructures that do not need to be directly connected to the Internet are not connected.

Lindy Cameron, CEO of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), explained what companies need to do: “First, organizations need to establish a clear security direction with their suppliers, asking for and incentivizing good security through the supply chain. This is often relatively straightforward security practices, such as controlling how privileged access is managed. Second, organizations should take an approach where their design is resilient if a technology supplier is compromised. The SolarWinds incident is a good example. To be blunt, if your SolarWinds installation couldn’t talk directly to the internet – which it shouldn’t have been able to do – then the whole attack was irrelevant to your network.”

Cameron said organizations need to take an approach where their design is resilient, even if a technology provider is affected, citing the SolarWinds attack as a good example.

“To be blunt, if your SolarWinds installation couldn’t talk directly to the internet – which it shouldn’t have been able to do – then the whole attack was irrelevant to your network,” she said