I had the opportunity recently at a CDM conference to lead finance and health sector CISO conversation about how the Huawei-like issues are impacting us. It was fascinating.

I was also the MC at the event, so at the start of the day I asked more generally how many people were thinking about it, and almost no one was concerned. Fast forward to after lunch, and we started with this chart –

Source: The economist.com

It didn’t take very long before we were discussing the challenges of third-party providers and the risks in provisioning at a second or third level out form what we directly control. Data thrown around (sorry, no source) would say that supply chain attacks are up 78% in 2018. The complexity of our supply chains can significantly obscure the real risks. Even M&A demands a different kind of diligence.

The consensus at the end of the conversation was that we need to dig deeper in three areas:

  • Architecture – know where your environment is outside your comfort zone
  • Inventory – know where the stuff you use could be creating an exposure
  • Supply Chain – consider where your bias for cost efficiency may be opening new exposures

The conference attendees were largely US-based or global – I wonder if we think we are more, or less exposed here in Canada?

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Jim Love, Chief Content Officer, IT World Canada
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Alizabeth Calder
Alizabeth Calder is a senior technology strategist and a certified corporate director (ICD.D) Alizabeth is also a successful author. Her most recent project – Duty of Care; An Executive Guide for Corporate Boards in the Digital Era – is a much-needed guide for business leaders who need to close their digital knowledge gap in order to make the right decisions about digital technology investment and deployments. Alizabeth has been an active CIO since 1997. Her strategic accomplishments cross many industry sectors and demonstrate the practical value she brings to the digital conversation. As a CIO on demand and consultant, Alizabeth has delivered more than $1B in transformational investments.