Tuesday, June 15, 2021

Recording industry sues 8,000 more

Stepping up its battle against online music piracy, the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry announced thousands of new lawsuits against those it suspects of illegal file-sharing.

The recording industry group has filed 8,000 new lawsuits in 17 countries, bringing the total number of suits it has filed outside the U.S. to 13,000, the IFPI announced Tuesday. That’s on top of about 18,000 lawsuits already filed in the U.S., said Alex Jacob, an IFPI spokesman in London.

The most recent lawsuits are against those suspected of uploading large numbers of music files to peer-to-peer networks such as BitTorrent, eDonkey and Limewire, according to IFPI.

Pursuing such “mass uploaders” can be more effective than suing people who download a few individual tracks, Jacob said.

Many of the people sued were the parents of children suspected of illegal file-sharing, the IFPI said. Parents can be held liable in some countries for activity that takes place over the household Internet connection. The group also sued some cyber cafes that it said facilitated music piracy.

The suits, which are a mixture of civil and criminal actions, include the first cases brought by the IFPI in Brazil, Mexico and Poland. In Brazil, more than a billion songs were illegally downloaded last year, causing record company revenues in that country to halve over the past five years to US$394 million, according to the IFPI.

“Since the music sales have gone down at the same time that file-sharing has exploded, it seems logical that at least some of those sales were lost to illegal downloads,” Jacob said.

Of the cases outside the U.S., about 2,300 people have settled with the IFPI rather than face fines, with the average settlement at

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