When two become one

A few weeks ago, when I was struggling with the idea of bringing ComputerWorld Canada and Computing Canada together, I decided to take a break from my work by reading the newspaper.

I chose the Globe and Mail, and it was only after putting the paper down on the table I had an epiphany: The Globe and Mail, like the publication you hold in your hands now, was also the merger of two rivals.

The Globe was founded in 1844 by a group of political liberals, while the Mail and Empire had launched a few decades later in 1872 by conservatives. Despite their editorial differences, they were combined in 1936 as part of an effort that was enshrined in a motto you’ll still find on the front page today – to become Canada’s national newspaper. In a similar way, I want to make ComputerWorld Canada the publication of record for the professionals who are changing the way we work through the application of advanced information technology.

You’ll see a few familiar elements from both titles, but I hope you’ll also find a lot of things that weren’t in either publication before. This includes a greater mix of short and long stories, better use of photography and a cleaner look and feel. More importantly, you should notice a logical structure to the way we’ve set up the book.

We start off with news, of course, followed by an opinion section that puts recent events and trends in context. Instead of the usual 2,000-word feature story, however, we’ve created an IT Business section with three features, each of which will examine technology or strategies to enable business, manage complexity or reduce costs and inefficiencies.

In Portfolio, we offer a helpful guide to the products that can put the strategy you’ve learned in IT Business in action. You’ll find a detailed deconstruction of the latest hardware, a step-by-step look at enterprise software, comparison pricing and personal technology insights from our sister publication, PCWorld.ca. Once you’ve armed yourself with the right tools, Management & Careers will offer the advice you need to take your job to the next level. We’ll end with Shark Tales, a Canadian take on the lighter side of IT.

This is the editorial journey we’re inviting you to take with us. I hope you enjoy the ride.