Kaspersky hunts for hackers down under

SYDNEY – Kaspersky Labs will open its first Australian research and development lab in Melbourne to collect local data on the proliferation of malware and potential for cyber-terrorism.

The IT security company will employ about 15 cryptographic engineers over the next two months and recruit a further 15 over the next three years, in addition to opening offices in each state.

The office, which opened Wednesday, will provide technical support for users and resellers, while its research arm will collect statistics on hacking and malware in Australia and collaborate with local law enforcement.

Kaspersky CEO and co-founder Eugene Kaspersky told reporters in Sydney on Tuesday the facility will try to paint a picture of Aussie hacking and work with local authorities to improve national security.

“Every country is unique in hacking and malware distribution; China is different to Japan and Russia, and we will learn what Australians are good at,” Kaspersky said.

“We would like to help the police and law enforcement by giving them data from our labs, which could protect Australia from cyber attacks and reduce malware.”

Kaspersky, who is on a two-month worldwide tour, said technical support will be brought in-house over the next few years while anti-malware research will be in full-swing by mid next year.

The Melbourne office is part of the company’s plan to open local research facilities in every country to better understand the machinations of cybercrime.

Australia and New Zealand channel director Alexey Gromyko who heads the regional office said the company will have improved response times for local IT security threats.

As part of Kaspersky’s tour, he was in Canada last month. To read his Sept. 30 interview with ITWorld Canada, click here.

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