James Allchin ‘would buy a Mac’

Longtime Windows development chief James Allchin wrote in a January 2004 e-mail to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and company co-founder Bill Gates that the software vendor had “lost sight” of customers’ needs and said he would buy a Mac if he wasn’t working for Microsoft.

“In my view, we lost our way,” Allchin, the co-president of Microsoft’s platform and services division, wrote in an e-mail dated Jan. 7, 2004.

The e-mail was presented as evidence last month in the Iowa antitrust trial, Comes v. Microsoft Corporation.

“I think our teams lost sight of what bug-free means, what resilience means, what full scenarios mean, what security means, what performance means, how important current applications are, and really understanding what the most important problems our customers face are. I see lots of random features and some great vision, but that does not translate into great products.”

Allchin, who has headed various aspects of Windows development since the mid-1990s but plans to retire at the end of this year with the shipping of Windows Vista, later wrote in the same e-mail that he would buy a Mac if he was not a Microsoft employee, according to transcripts from proceedings in the class-action case obtained by Groklaw.net, an open-source legal Web site.

Jim Hibbs, a spokesman for Wixted Pope Nora Thompson & Associates, a Des Moines public relations firm employed by the law firm prosecuting the case, confirmed that Allchin’s quotes were read directly from his e-mails by the plaintiffs’ lawyers.

The case, filed in February 2000, charges that Microsoft used its monopoly position to overcharge Iowans for its software.

Held in the Polk County District Court in Des Moines, it is one of two remaining antitrust cases — the state of Mississippi’s case is the other — brought by the U.S. government and multiple states against Microsoft starting in the late 1990s.

In 2004, Microsoft settled a class-action lawsuit accusing it of overcharging customers in California for US$1.1 billion.

That same year, it was also hit by a US$613 million fine by the European Commission for monopolistic behaviour for its free bundling of Windows Media Player with Windows. In my view, we have lost our way. We’ve lost sight of what bug-free means.-AllchinText

Microsoft has appealed the ruling. It was hit by a US$356 million fine in October for failing to comply with the ruling.

Microsoft, through its public relations firm, Waggener Edstrom Worldwide Inc., was unable to provide comment on the Allchin e-mail immediately.

Allchin has said in the past that the delayed arrival of the new Windows Vista Operating System — it shipped five years after Windows XP was released to the market — was the result of a desire to improve Vista’s security and to ensure that the software would perform bug-free from the get-go.