High on Wi-Fi

Voiceglo, a voice-over-IP (VoIP) service provider, says it has developed a communication system that transforms wireless routers into PBXs. The Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based firm earlier this month unveiled the Voiceglo Internet PBX, a system that supports up to 254 phone lines and provides virtual call management via a Wi-Fi router. The device is tied into Voiceglo’s VoIP service, which provides unlimited calling in Canada and the U.S. Voiceglo says benefits include easy moves, adds and changes, as well as simple set-up for employees working off site. For more info visit www.voiceglo.com.

Low IQ

VoiceIQ Inc. says its future depends “on its ability to raise additional capital and restore and maintain profitable operations” after the digital recording manufacturer discovered its finances were even worse than originally stated. The Markham, Ont. company initially said its Q1 2004 bottom line spelled a $273,045 loss, but upon investigation VoiceIQ learned that the loss was closer to $1.8 million, an increase of 551 per cent. VoiceIQ blames the error on contracts improperly recorded as revenue, among other things. The firm says it has retained a financial advisor to help straighten out the situation.

No middling trend

Nortel Networks says businesses are adopting converged communications infrastructures “at unprecedented levels.” The Brampton, Ont.-based network gear maker surveyed 430 members of the International Nortel Networks Users Association to learn that 27 per cent of them had already installed converged systems, including equipment that puts voice traffic onto data networks. Nearly 80 per cent of respondents said they planned to install converged communication substructures within the next five years. Benefits include simplified application integration and less expensive network administration, but respondents also said they’re not completely convinced convergence spells cost savings.