Next year promises to be a big one for private cloud adoption, according to IDC’s research director, Asia Pacific IT services research, Chris Morris.

“There are continued concerns over security, availability and performance issues,” said Morris. He was speaking at IDC’s Cloud Computing Conference 2010 held in Singapore this morning.

From the vendors’ side, many suppliers have made announcements to provide some form of private cloud services in the past year. One example is the news of Fujitsu, HP and Dell partnering with Microsoft to offer private clouds on the latter’s Azure platform in July this year.

Less risky

Results from IDC’s APEJ Cloud Computing end-user survey 2010 indicate that users in Singapore are planning to place significant parts of their workload into private cloud environments instead of public cloud environments.

Private clouds are seen as a less risky way to gain some benefits of cloud computing without exposure to the downsides. IDC notes that many users, faced with limited know-how of cloud technologies, are considering external located private clouds offered by telco service providers. These private clouds provide a low-risk and quick way for companies to implement the cloud.

Meanwhile, a rapid maturation of cloud computing is giving rise to the trend of a “shifting cloud deployment model,” said Morris. He noted that CIOs would have a mix of public and private clouds under the enterprise portfolio.

He added that instead of viewing the cloud as a collection of new technologies, “savvy CIOs now see the cloud as being an extension of their sourcing strategies”.