Telecom briefs

It’s back to the drawing board for Bell Canada after the CRTC said the incumbent telco must resubmit a number of tariffs for approval. The Commission in September said Bell had provided not enough details about certain contracts with customers. The CRTC had requested the info after a review of Bell’s business practices last year. Back then the Commission decided that the carrier might be offering enterprise communication services at below-regulation prices, which upset Bell’s competitors. For more information, see the CRTC’s Web site,, particularly Telecom Decisions 2002-76 and 2003-63.

No digital dustbowl

Saskatchewan’s incumbent telco SaskTel continues its rollout of high-speed Internet service across the province. The carrier in September added Aberdeen, Bengough, Central Butte, Sedley, Tompkins, Willow Bunch and Wymark to its growing list of places where residents can get a quick Internet connection. The expansion effort is part of the province’s CommunityNet program, which is meant to seed the prairie landscape with zippy links. SaskTel says 74 per cent of the population is served by high-speed. The carrier is exploring wireline and wireless technologies to bring high-speed to 95 per cent of Saskatchewanians.

IP a strategic advantage?

Canadian companies would do well to embrace IP-based phone systems, lest the laggards find themselves unable to take advantage of new opportunities, according to researchers at SeaBoard Group. The Montreal-based telecom consultancy in September released a report saying 75 per cent of requests for proposals on new communication equipment call for a phased migration to converged networks over the next 12 to 36 months. The analysts suggest IP could represent a strategic advantage for the enterprise that employs the technology. For more info on SeaBoard’s report, Beyond Ernestine, visit