Richard Bray

The impact of advanced technologies and the changing geopolitical environment has produced what is called the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA). The effects of RMA were shown to the world during the Gulf War, and the U.S. has since led the way in advanced weapons systems. But it’s also affected the Canadian branches of the military, reports Richard Bray.

Bray is a freelance writer in Nepean, Ont., specializing in high-technology and public sector procurement. Currently Editor of Ottawa Computes!, he has also written for Summit Magazine, Wired, Maxim and the Ottawa Citizen as well as publications in Australia. He has recently completed assignments in such far-flung destinations as Bosnia and California’s Silicon Valley. Bray is a former producer, reporter and senior writer with the CBC in Toronto.

Graeme Gordon

Graeme is a graduate of McGill University, with a major in Management Information Systems. He graduated in 1984 with honors and was awarded the Faculty prize for top student in his Major, as well as the distinctions of Faculty Scholar and University Scholar.

Graeme began his career with Accenture in 1986. He has worked with various Government clients in both Canada and in the United States, including the Canadian International Development Agency; the Department of Finance; the Department of National Defense; the U.S. Department of Defense, Canada Post, the Unites States Postal Service (USPS), the Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC).

Graeme is responsible for Accenture’s Canadian eGovernment practice. He specializes in the area of eGovernment, as well as the program management of large, complex systems integration initiatives. He has implemented a number of eCommerce programs for both USPS and CPC, including the launch of USPS’s new web site USPS.COM. He has also participated in the development of eCommerce strategies for CPC, CIHR and for NSERC.

David Newman

Privacy and security issues have been hearty, if time-consuming, policy dishes at the dinner table of the Lac Carling Congress since its inception. But as Ottawa-based writer and consultant David Newman recently learned, the two are as different as night and day and, according to the experts, should be treated accordingly.

To underscore the point, Brenda Watkins, Coordinator of Authentication Services Policy in the Chief Information Officer Branch of the Treasury Board Secretariat says, “it is important to differentiate between the two concepts, because they can have differing or contradictory objectives. For example, monitoring and logging certain activities in intrusion detection to protect critical system components from being subverted can lead to recording and storing information. That could present an invasion of privacy.”

Besides Watkins, Newman speaks to several other high-raking officials in the federal government to learn how to tackle the formidable task of separating the twin challenges of security and privacy.