Software provider Computer Associates International Inc. and corporate security services provider Pinkerton Consulting and Investigations Inc. announced in April that they will partner up in order to provide security services at both the cyber and physical levels. According to the companies, the alliance will mean additional technologies and service capabilities targeted at a wide range of security concerns, including insider attacks, unlawful use of corporate assets, theft of intellectual property, executive protection and workplace violence prevention. The security services offered by the companies are now available to customers. Target markets for this alliance include large enterprises and government organizations.

Novell likes Linux

At its annual BrainShare user and partner conference in Salt Lake City last month, Novell executives announced that NetWare 7, due out in approximately two years, will be a set of services that sits on top of both the NetWare and Linux kernels. Novell Chairman and CEO Jack Messman said Novell customers paying maintenance fees will have the option over time to migrate from the NetWare kernel to the Linux kernel if they choose. “It’s a good migration path for NetWare users who were worried about where we were going with NetWare,” Messman said. “It gives customers comfort” that file, print, storage, directory, Web development, resource management and other NetWare services will be available for the long haul, he said.

Workplace surfing on the rise

Canadian employers are paying employees to shop online, bank online and send personal e-mails during work hours, says a recent report. The study, released in April by Ipsos-Reid Corp., found that Canadian adults spend four and-a-half hours a week surfing the Internet for personal reasons – more than double the number of hours spent on the Internet in 2000. The quarterly report tracks Canadians and their Internet activity behaviours. The study found that 38 per cent of Canadian adults have Internet access at work, up from 34 per cent in 2000. Among those with Internet access, 88 per cent admit to using the Internet at work for personal reasons, up 10 per cent from 2000.