2004: An e-government odyssey

With less than two weeks remaining in the run-up to the Canadian federal election, the Toronto Star stated the governing Liberal Party’s total federal spending on science and technology had declined significantly throughout the 1990s.

Which pointed to one of the major issues facing each candidate for the Prime Minister’s Office (PMO), one that was given nary a consideration during the election battle: how best to address the country’s growing technological needs from both a personal and business standpoint.

Beyond lowering the capital gains tax to encourage investment in new business ventures and the reduction of personal income tax in an effort to quell IT talent from shuffling stateside – which the Liberals did prior to the announcement of the election – what is the federal government doing to promote the growth of the new economy and encourage home-grown knowledge workers to stay put?

If there had been concern that Prime Minister Jean Chreti