Some IT schools get failing grades

Rumors abound about the ludicrous promises and pressure tactics employed by “education mills.” Insiders at many a retail mill operation say that the pressure to increase admission numbers is constant and outweighs any consideration of whether a potential enrollee has technical aptitude or will likely finish the training.

Consider the mills’ target students, the unsuspecting and naive. The “schools” close the deal — sometimes in as little as two weeks — on the aspiring entrant’s IT paycheck dream. The promise is that they’ll be making the big bucks after graduation, and all they will need is that training certificate, no real-world experience required.

For someone seeking opportunity, a student enrollment and a loan agreement seems like the right path. For an admission rep trying to fill a quota, the ability to do the coursework be damned.

IT hiring managers and recruiters know the truth. Resumes listing perfect grades or MSCE training received from some mills are sent straight to the manager’s circular e-file. The grads just cannot do the work.

Little wonder. At some facilities, students find outdated equipment, shared computers, and instructors in and out a revolving door. That’s no way to spend time or dollars.