There’s very little private information that intelligence agencies cannot access, according to Edward Snowden

Prism whistleblower hoped Obama would bring change

The former security contractor who blew the whistle on the National Security Agency’s Prism program said he was holding off on leaking details about the cyber snooping activity in the hope that President Barack Obama’s re-election would put an end to the government’s “abusive programs.”

Obama’s campaign promises gave him “faith,” Edward Snowden said in new interview with the Guardian, the publication that broke the story about the NSA’s data mining campaign. Shortly after assuming office, however, “he (Obama) closed the door on investigating systemic violations of law, deepened and expanded several abusive programs” and refused to end human rights violations in Guantanamo Bay, Snowden said.
 
(Edward Snowden)

Snowden, who two weeks ago revealed to the Guardian details of how U.S. intelligence agencies are secretly empowered by law to compel American companies to release metadata on customer communications, is believed to be hiding out in Hong Kong. James Clapper, director of National Intelligence, admitted the existence of Prism but said the anti-terrorist surveillance program was not aimed at American citizens living in the U.S.

In his latest interview, Snowden said there is very little private information that intelligence agents cannot access.

In reality, he said, “if an NSA, FBI, CIA, DIA, etc., analyst has access to query raw SIGINT (signal intelligence) databases,” they can retrieve anything they want.

He said agents can obtain phone numbers, email, user identification, cell phone and handset I.D.s, and other data, because the restrictions are policy-based and “not technically based.”

For instance, he said, if an individual were targeted for investigation, “the security analysts gets it all…I.P.s, raw data, content, headers, attachments, everything.”

Read the full Snowden Q&A here

Share on LinkedIn Share with Google+ Comment on this article