Attention developers of Internet of Things devices: The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) has updated its 2018 Top 10 IoT vulnerabilities list.

If you’re a creator or manufacturer of IoT devices, these are the potential traps that have to be fixed before a product is released. The list comes as a colourful chart that can be posted.

And if you’re a buyer of IoT products these are the vulnerabilities you should be looking for before putting down cash.

The primary theme for the list is simplicity, says OWASP. “Rather than having separate lists for risks vs. threats vs. vulnerabilities—or for developers vs. enterprises vs. consumers—the project team elected to have a single, unified list that captures the top things to avoid when dealing with IoT Security.

“The team recognized that there are now dozens of organizations releasing elaborate guidance on IoT Security—all of which are designed for slightly different audiences and industry verticals. We thought the most useful resource we could create is a single list that addresses the highest priority issues for manufacturers, enterprises, and consumers at the same time.”

1-Weak, Guessable, or Hardcoded Passwords

Use of easily brute-forced, publicly available, or unchangeable credentials, including backdoors in firmware or client software that grants unauthorized access to deployed systems.

2-Insecure Network Services 

Unneeded or insecure network services running on the device itself, especially those exposed to the internet, that compromise the confidentiality, integrity/authenticity, or availability of information or allow unauthorized remote control…

3-Insecure Ecosystem Interfaces

Insecure web, backend API, cloud, or mobile interfaces in the ecosystem outside of the device that allows compromise of the device or its related components. Common issues include a lack of authentication/authorization, lacking or weak encryption, and a lack of input and output filtering.

4-Lack of Secure Update Mechanism

Lack of ability to securely update the device. This includes lack of firmware validation on device, lack of secure delivery (un-encrypted in transit), lack of anti-rollback mechanisms, and lack of notifications of security changes due to updates.

5-Use of Insecure or Outdated Components

Use of deprecated or insecure software components/libraries that could allow the device to be compromised. This includes insecure customization of operating system platforms, and the use of third-party software or hardware components from a compromised supply chain.

6-Insufficient Privacy Protection

User’s personal information stored on the device or in the ecosystem that is used insecurely, improperly, or without permission.

7-Insecure Data Transfer and Storage
Lack of encryption or access control of sensitive data anywhere within the ecosystem, including at rest, in transit, or during processing.

8-Lack of Device Management

Lack of security support on devices deployed in production, including asset management, update management, secure decommissioning, systems monitoring, and response capabilities.

9-Insecure Default Settings

Devices or systems shipped with insecure default settings or lack the ability to make the system more secure by restricting operators from modifying configurations.

10-Lack of Physical Hardening
Lack of physical hardening measures, allowing potential attackers to gain sensitive information that can help in a future remote attack or take local control of the device.

 



Related Download
Security Training Resource Kit Sponsor: ITWC
Security Training Resource Kit
Want to reduce your security incidents? Experts say that training can reduce security incidents by anywhere from 45% to 70%. But how do you train your employees effectively? Yes, you can send memos and do courses, but who reads this stuff? That's why we took a different approach.
Download Now