At the Intel CES 2020 conference on Jan. 6th, Intel gave a glimpse of its Tiger Lake processor, the next-gen processor that will succeed Ice Lake launched just last year.

Tiger Lake will be manufactured on 10nm+, a refined version of Intel’s current 10nm transistors. The more pluses there are behind the node’s name, the more mature the transistor process. Improved manufacturing processes usually bring better energy efficiency and higher transistor density. For example, Intel’s Coffee Lake processors are manufactured using its 14nm++ transistors.

Also:

Intel Tiger Lake, NUC, Comet Lake-H sneak peek


Through fine-tuning the architecture, Intel promised that Tiger Lake will bring “double-digit performance gains” over Ice Lake. In addition, it will be updated with a next-generation AI engine and even more robust integrated graphics based on its new Xe graphics architecture.

The press conference heavily underscored the importance and utility of AI for professional creatives. Tools like Tapaz can sharpen blurry photos automatically; Adobe Photoshop and Premier can also take advantage of Intel’s AI engine to make better object selections and dynamic subject trimming in videos.

Gregory Bryant, executive vice-president of Intel computing group, shows off a tiny motherboard designed for Tiger Lake. Photo by Tom Li.

To demonstrate its graphics performance, Intel showed a Tiger Lake equipped laptop running several popular videogames at consistent 60 frames per second at 1080p resolution.

Tiger Lake will support Thunderbolt 4 and Wi-Fi 6.

Intel supplemented the Tiger Lake news by showing off a motherboard almost as small as a smartphone. While the company didn’t announce where such a concept would be used, it can enable more computing power in ultra-compact systems such as the Intel NUC.

Tiger Lake is expected to arrive later this year.

 



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