Music gets more secure

EMI Music Canada has partnered with Toronto-based Musicrypt Inc. to bring a new single from the recording studio to the radio station securely via the Internet.

EMI, in Mississauga, Ont., used Musicrypt’s Digital Media Distribution System (DMDS) to service the new single “Generation Genocide” by Canadian artist Jersey to radio stations across the country. DMDS uses one million bit encryption and biometric authentication to ensure digital files maintain integrity through Internet transfers.

The song travelled from the recording studio, in London, Ont., to the record label office – where it passed through several departments – and then on to radio stations. In the past, the single would be burned to CD at the studio and then passed on to the label before copies were made to distribute to radio and media outlets.

Those in-between stages are where the tracks would often get pirated and then downloaded to the Web, essentially “leaking” the songs before they got played on the air, according to an EMI spokesperson.

“We’re just working to curb that,” the spokesperson said.

Cliff Hunt, chairman for Musicrypt, said the DMDS uses keystroke dynamics to identify individuals who can access the songs from the Web-based system. Keystroke dynamics refers to authenticating individuals through their unique keyboard rhythm.

DMDS has also been installed at the offices of select broadcasting consultants, publications and Nielsen Broadcast Data System’s Toronto office and its White Plains, N.Y.-based headquarters. Nielsen provides off-the-air tracking for the entertainment industry.