March Networks releases hybrid NVRs

Ottawa-based Internet Protocol surveillance product manufacturer March Networks today launched a new line of network video recorders capable of controlling both analog and digital IP security cameras.

The company’s 8000 Series hybrid NVRs are ideal for large enterprise as well as small and medium sized firms transitioning from analog to digital systems, according to Net Payne, chief marketing officer for March Networks.

March Networks is a subsidiary of China-based surveillance equipment company Infinova. March supplies surveillance equipment for the majority of Canadian banks as well as a number of retail operations including Walmart.

“There are numerous organizations in various industries that are heavily invested in aging analog systems,” said Payne. “The 8000 series ensures that these businesses can securely transition to newer IP cameras without sacrificing their analog investments because the system enables them to replace existing units at their own pace.”

Companies that strategically use a mixture of analog cameras (to economize on video data storage) and IP cameras (to obtain high quality recordings in specific areas) can benefit from the series’ device management and high-definition recording.

Available in four models, the NVRs can support any combination of u to 32 analog or IP cameras of up to 5 megapixels.

The two 8732 R, rack versions of the machines sell for up to $10,000. The two 8516 S, stackable versions ideal for SMB operations sell for up to $3,995 per unit.

The machine’s H. 264 video compression delivers high-definition 30 frames per second video images from analog cameras without increasing storage requirements, said Dan Cremins, director of product line management for March.
The March Network Searchlight console
 
“It’s capability of storing up to 3 TB of video data that can be mirrored or backed up is ideal for companies like banks or huge financial institutions that store video for as up to 90 days,,” said Cremins.

The 800 Series uses an embedded Linux operating system, an internal backup battery and real-time health monitoring security feature to protect data and ensure the machine functions even during power outages.

For channel partners and system installers, the 8000 series comes with a QR-coded panel that provides technicians with essential information about each unit. Using March’s GURU mobile app for Apple iOS and Android device, a technician can scan the code and instantly get information such as warranty status, parts information and even trouble shooting support.

March also offers the latest release of its Command Enterprise video management system software (VMS) and the March Network Searchlight, a Web-based application which help users speed up video investigations.

The company is also offering two new IP camera models, the HDMegaPX WDR MiniDome Z and the standard definition CAMPx WDR MiiDome. The cameras employ H. 264 compression and have wide dynamic range video capture ideal for variably lit areas such as retail stores and bank branches.

Although IP camera and IP-based NVRs have been around for nearly seven years now, it has only been in the last three to four years that they have enjoyed more widespread adoption, according to Ed Fitchett, president of Fitch Surveillance Systems Inc. in Toronto.

“I think 2013 will be the turn-around year for IP cameras,” he said. “A 2011 industry survey indicated that for the first time in five years, sales of IP cameras equaled those of analog units. This year IP will likely surpass analog.”

He said adoption is being diven by customers, even in the SMB sector, who are specifying high-resolution and high-definition cameras.

 



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