It’s a Lean, Mean Inventing Machine

If your R&D department has been a little behind developing new ideas, and the continuous supply of fresh doughnuts and Starbucks coffee isn’t helping, you might want to check out some software from Boston-based Invention Machine Corp.

The company’s knowledge-based innovation tools target product development in the engineering, scientific and R&D areas. The brainchild of Invention Machine chairman and CEO Valery Tsourikov, the company’s flagship software, CoBrain, addresses the problem inherent in today’s exhaustive process of innovation: the difficulty of finding and extracting technical knowledge from multiple and expanding information sources such as the Internet and company databases.

“Access to high-quality knowledge is a pain,” says Tsourikov, who has worked on semantic processing for nearly 20 years and received a patent on his innovative algorithm. “We have a pain killer.”

On first hearing, CoBrain might sound like just a souped-up search engine. But CoBrain actually doesn’t search at all. Instead, it uses semantic processing technology to extract key concepts from company databases, intranets and the Internet. The software reads the content, creates a problem-solution tree and delivers an abstract listing the technical content in relevant documents.

The Web-based software runs on a company’s server; users access it right from their Web browsers. So, for example, a researcher looking for help in fighting noise might find that rear suspension, foam rubber and gas bubbles all absorb noise. From there, she can go get whatever data she thinks will best help her.

Pricing for CoBrain starts at US$250,000. For more information, call (617) 305-9250 or visit