InterGovWorld Remembers

To commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of WWII, 2005 was officially called “The Year of the Veteran“.

Activities and events were planned across all levels of government as part of Canada’s year-long expression of thanks to war service veterans and veterans of the Canadian Forces.

It’s one year later and November 5 through 11 marks Veterans’ Week.

Last year one of the most prominent and successful federal government campaigns belonged to Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) which embraced technology to deliver their message.

PWGSC’s innovative campaign used new media technology to inform public servants and the Canadian public of its contributions to Canada’s war effort on the home front, particularly in the areas of social change, construction and industry.

Six posters, 12 postcards, two newsletters and a Flash and HTML web presentation used vintage photos that brought to life the campaigns themes. The high-tech approach mixed with PWGSC newsletters — 40s-stylized bilingual newspapers — provided a nice balance and contrast between messaging using traditional print media and messaging using electronic new media technology.

The Web sites showcased photographs collected from the National Archives of Canada on war efforts on the home front.

“As a promotional marketing campaign that was developed in-house, PWGSC Remembers was truly a team effort,” said Lina Calamo, director of the Marketing Group at PWGSC. “My group developed the overall approach, themes, messaging and design for both the print and electronic campaign, which highlighted the contributions of everyday Canadians.”

Calamo felt very fortunate that her group was mandated to develop a campaign showcasing the vital role her department played in supporting Canada’s veterans and allies during WW II.

“I am proud to be working with such a dedicated, creative and enthusiastic team,” she said.

The Flash and HTML strategy was the result of efforts by marketing manager Mike Fabbro.

Fabbro, no stranger to technology, served as a Major in the Canadian Armed Forces for 26 years and was instrumental in introducing and implementing several technological initiatives to the Department of National Defence’s Combat Camera.

Combat Camera is a photo and video database that provides users with real-time photography and video from the battlefields like Afghanistan. It serves as the eyes and the ears for the Canadian public.

Fabbro’s efforts included introducing the Combat Camera team to more effective and efficient Mac technology, as well as streaming video capabilities.

Today’s industry standard for the Internet is multimedia, according to Fabbro.

“Look at television and the Internet,” he said. “TV is affecting and influencing the net and the net is affecting and influencing TV. This trend is increasing and not decreasing as we’ve seen with recent news headlines.”

“As a communicator, video capability is fresh and compelling, which adds and enhances messaging.”

If you don’t have video, you are essentially yesterday’s news, he said.

A number of activities are being planned for this year’s Veterans’ Week.

Combat Camera will feature photos and videos in real-time from Remembrance events taking place in various locations all over the world.

Visit the Combat Camera and Veterans Affairs Canada web site for more information and additional resources.

Visit the Department of National Defence’s Combat Camera web site here.

Visit Veterans Affairs Canada – Veterans’ Week 2006 web site here.

Visit Veterans Affairs Canada – Year of the Veteran 2005 web site here.

Visit Veterans Affairs Canada – Canada Remembers web site here.

Visit the Public Works and Government Services Canada web site here.