Inboxes were expected to be a little less overwhelming thanks to Canada’s new spam law. The reaction on Twitter suggests otherwise.

“Please confirm your interest.” “Let’s stay in touch.” “Opt-in to continue receiving valuable content.” “FOR THE LOVE OF GOD PLEASE LET US STOP SPAMMING YOU.”

After more than a week of near desperate attempts to avoid the worst impacts of the Canadian anti spam legislation (CASL), it was probably natural that Canadian technology experts were spending less time talking about hard-core enterprise IT issues than they were about e-mail. Of course, CASL will have implications on the way data is collected, stored and managed across networks and databases, but for the most part the discussions have been more emotional.

Of course, Industry Canada was among the first to use its account to position the new law as something that would provide more public benefit than business headaches.

As more than one IT professional has pointed out, however, the trans-border nature of the technology industry means we won’t necessarily see a huge decrease in spam anytime soon. In fact, the CRTC has reportedly already been flooded with more than 1,000 complaints under CASL since July 1.

Not everyone was complaining, however. In fact, some CIOs might be hearing positive feedback from their counterparts in finance and other line of business areas.

For others, CASL represents a potential new business opportunity, particularly for those involved in user experience design and related fields.

And then there are the Canadian vendors who hope to see a resurgence in a more analogue approach to communication.

For more great CASL commentary, see the FollowFriday feature on our sister site, ITBusiness.ca.

 

Related Download
Fast track to the future							Sponsor: IBM Canada Ltd
Fast track to the future
Download Fast Track to the Future, IBM’s third annual Tech Trends report, and find out where business stands in the adoption of social, mobile, cloud and analytics technologies; the hurdles to their implementation; how the speed of change is creating skills gaps at some companies; why security is an issue that pervades the business, not just the IT department; how growth markets differ in their adoption of and preparation for new technologies; and much more.
Register Now
Share on LinkedIn Share with Google+ Comment on this article