IBM Corp

. recently announced it is the first company to ship products based on a breakthrough industry-standard technology for tape storage. According to the company, using IBM’s Linear Tape-Open Ultrium (LTO Ultrium) products, customers can back-up information with up to twice the capacity and speed at about the same cost of existing technology. LTO Ultrium products are geared to customers who need to back-up large volumes of digital data, and were specifically designed for use in automatic tape storage libraries that employ robotic arms to automatically retrieve tapes. IBM said the tape can transfer information at 30MB/sec. The new tape storage products range from 100GB in one tape drive, to 248 terabytes. IBM plans to market the LTO Ultrium drives and tapes for UNIX and Windows 2000/NT users with the IBM brand. The UltraScalable Tape Library and Tape Drive are available now, and the Tape Autoloader and Scalable Tape Library will be available at the end of the month. Pricing starts at US$9,250. For details, visit



Pittsburgh, Pa., and Atlanta, Ga.-based Marconi Communications has developed what it calls an easy-to-manage solution for enterprise network security that protects enterprises from unwanted intrusions, while maintaining high-speed network performance. According to the company, Marconi’s Security Appliance solution scales to protect multiple secure environments and transparently filters traffic at OC-3c and OC-12c rates. Marconi said its Security Appliances include enhanced management interfaces that are invisible to would-be hackers from outside the campus, or to unauthorized users from inside the enterprise. The SA-400 is the initial release in the Security Appliance portfolio. Based on standard PCI architecture, the SA-400 includes an IP/ATM firewall line card with options for ATM OC-12c serial management ports. Available now, the SA-400 is priced at US$15,000 for the OC-3c option and US$25,000 for the OC-12c option.