Security management software company NetIQ Corp. last month announced that it had agreed to acquire Auckland, New Zealand-based Marshal Software Ltd. for US$23 million in cash. Marshal Software provides e-mail scanning, Web filtering and Internet content management software to 3,500 customers in 30 countries, NetIQ said in a statement. The acquisition will add content security and spam-blocking capabilities to NetIQ’s migration, security administration and performance management products, the company said. Marshal Software’s products include MailMarshal, e-mail scanning software that blocks spam and viruses and WebMarshal, an Internet access control and monitoring application. The acquisition is expected to be completed by the end of this year.

AmberPoint integrates with Tivoli

AmberPoint Inc. and IBM Corp.’s Tivoli Systems Inc. unit are to integrate their software products, AmberPoint announced last month. AmberPoint’s Web services management will be added to Tivoli’s system management products, AmberPoint said. For example, users of the Tivoli software will now benefit from AmberPoint’s ability to use both Java and Microsoft Corp.’s .Net technology, which gives its Web services management software greater flexibility, the Oakland, Calif.-based company said in a statement. AmberPoint includes Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. (MetLife) and the energy company, TransCanada PipeLines Ltd., among its clients, according to the company’s Web site.

Consolidation for mgmt. vendors in 2003?

A recent study by Gartner Inc. predicts that the enterprise network management market will undergo some consolidation in the next three years, which might not suit the vendors, but could result in lower price points for software buyers. November’s study says the poor economic conditions and glut of companies will result in the consolidation of enterprise management vendors between 2003 and 2006. In particular, Gartner predicts that between 2003 and 2006, the consolidation of storage management companies will increase by 66 per cent. Also, the research firm says two-thirds of the application server management market will cease to exist.